NuSTAR DISCOVERY OF A 3.76 s TRANSIENT MAGNETAR NEAR SAGITTARIUS A*

@article{Mori2013NuSTARDO,
  title={NuSTAR DISCOVERY OF A 3.76 s TRANSIENT MAGNETAR NEAR SAGITTARIUS A*},
  author={Kaya Mori and Eric V. Gotthelf and Shuo Zhang and Hongjun An and Frederick K. Baganoff and Nicolas M. Barri{\`e}re and Andrei M. Beloborodov and Steven E. Boggs and Finn E. Christensen and William W. Craig and Françoise Dufour and Brian W. Grefenstette and Charles J. Hailey and Fiona A. Harrison and Jaesub Hong and Victoria M. Kaspi and Jamie A. Kennea and Kristin K. Madsen and Craig B. Markwardt and Melania Nynka and Daniel K. Stern and John A. Tomsick and Will Zhang},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2013},
  volume={770}
}
We report the discovery of 3.76 s pulsations from a new burst source near Sgr A* observed by the NuSTAR observatory. The strong signal from SGR J1745−29 presents a complex pulse profile modulated with pulsed fraction 27% ± 3% in the 3–10 keV band. Two observations spaced nine days apart yield a spin-down rate of =(6.5 ± 1.4) × 10−12. This implies a magnetic field B = 1.6 × 1014 G, spin-down power =5 × 1033 erg s−1, and characteristic age P/2 =9 × 103 yr for the rotating dipole model. However… 

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