Now We Want Our Funk Cut: Janelle Monáe’s Neo-Afrofuturism

@article{English2013NowWW,
  title={Now We Want Our Funk Cut: Janelle Mon{\'a}e’s Neo-Afrofuturism},
  author={Daylanne K. English and Alvin Kim},
  journal={American Studies},
  year={2013},
  volume={52},
  pages={217 - 230}
}
  • D. English, Alvin Kim
  • Published 26 September 2013
  • Sociology
  • American Studies
Multimedia conceptual artist Paul D. Miller (a.k.a. DJ Spooky/That Sub- liminal Kid) has recently argued that Afrofuturism is a thing of the past, a movement that, in his words, "wasn't digital enough . . . [and] didn't have a core group of people with any kind of coherent message. It was conceptually open ended without any kind of narrative."1 Miller's assessment of past forms of Af- rofuturism is certainly arguable, but contemporary singer, songwriter, dancer, performance artist, and self… 
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