Novel mechanisms for neuroendocrine regulation of aggression

@article{Soma2008NovelMF,
  title={Novel mechanisms for neuroendocrine regulation of aggression},
  author={Kiran K. Soma and Melissa-Ann L. Scotti and Amy E. M. Newman and Thierry D Charlier and Gregory E Demas},
  journal={Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology},
  year={2008},
  volume={29},
  pages={476-489}
}
In 1849, Berthold demonstrated that testicular secretions are necessary for aggressive behavior in roosters. Since then, research on the neuroendocrinology of aggression has been dominated by the paradigm that the brain receives gonadal hormones, primarily testosterone, which modulate relevant neural circuits. While this paradigm has been extremely useful, recent studies reveal important alternatives. For example, most vertebrate species are seasonal breeders, and many species show aggression… Expand
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