Noun and verb differences in picture naming: Past studies and new evidence

@article{Mtzig2009NounAV,
  title={Noun and verb differences in picture naming: Past studies and new evidence},
  author={Simone M{\"a}tzig and Judit Druks and Jackie Masterson and Gabriella Vigliocco},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2009},
  volume={45},
  pages={738-758}
}
We re-examine the double dissociation view of noun-verb differences by critically reviewing past lesion studies reporting selective noun or verb deficits in picture naming, and reporting the results of a new picture naming study carried out with aphasic patients and comparison participants. Since there are theoretical arguments and empirical evidence that verb processing is more demanding than noun processing, in the review we distinguished between cases that presented with large and small… Expand

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