Notice of gigantic horned Dinosauria from the Cretaceous

@article{MarshNoticeOG,
  title={Notice of gigantic horned Dinosauria from the Cretaceous},
  author={Othniel Charles Marsh},
  journal={American Journal of Science},
  volume={s3-38},
  pages={173 - 176}
}
  • O. C. Marsh
  • Published 1 August 1889
  • Geology
  • American Journal of Science
TilE remarkable reptiles which the writer recently described, and placed in a new family, the Oeratop8idm, * prove to be more and more wonderful as additional specimens are broug-ht to light. There appear to he two or three genera, and several well-inarked species, already discovered, and the object of the present paper is to notice briefly some of their characteristic features so far as investigated. 
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