Not in the Same Boat: Disasters and Differential Vulnerability in the Insular Caribbean

@article{LpezMarrero2012NotIT,
  title={Not in the Same Boat: Disasters and Differential Vulnerability in the Insular Caribbean},
  author={Tania L{\'o}pez-Marrero and Ben Wisner},
  journal={Caribbean Studies},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={129 - 168}
}
The Caribbean region is exposed to various natural hazards due to its geographic position and geological situation. Hurricanes, floods, landslides, earthquakes, and volcanoes cause loss of lives and property, disrupt livelihoods, and in some cases erase years of development. But not everyone suffers equally; the frequency and impacts of disasters triggered by natural hazards differ within the region. These differences reflect determinants of vulnerability and capacities, which include access to… 

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