Not all who ponder count costs: Arithmetic reflection predicts utilitarian tendencies, but logical reflection predicts both deontological and utilitarian tendencies

@article{Byrd2019NotAW,
  title={Not all who ponder count costs: Arithmetic reflection predicts utilitarian tendencies, but logical reflection predicts both deontological and utilitarian tendencies},
  author={Nick Byrd and Paul Conway},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2019},
  volume={192}
}
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Reasoning supports utilitarian resolutions to moral dilemmas across diverse measures.
TLDR
It is shown that individual differences in reasoning ability and cognitive style of thinking are positively associated with a preference for utilitarian solutions, but bear no relationship to harm-relevant concerns.
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