Nosema ceranae in South American Native Stingless Bees and Social Wasp

@article{Porrini2017NosemaCI,
  title={Nosema ceranae in South American Native Stingless Bees and Social Wasp},
  author={Mart{\'i}n Pablo Porrini and Leonardo Pablo Porrini and Paula Melisa Garrido and Carlos Melo e Silva Neto and Dar{\'i}o Pablo Porrini and Fernando Muller and Laura Alejandra Nu{\~n}ez and Leopoldo J. {\'A}lvarez and Pedro Fern{\'a}ndez Iriarte and Mart{\'i}n Javier Eguaras},
  journal={Microbial Ecology},
  year={2017},
  volume={74},
  pages={761-764}
}
Besides the incipient research effort, the role of parasites as drivers of the reduction affecting pollinator populations is mostly unknown. Given the worldwide extension of the beekeeping practice and the diversity of pathogens affecting Apis mellifera populations, honey bee colonies are a certain source of parasite dispersion to other species. Here, we communicate the detection of the microsporidium Nosema ceranae, a relatively new parasite of honey bees, in stingless bees (Meliponini) and… 

Pathogen spillover from Apis mellifera to a stingless bee

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The stingless bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini): a review of the current threats to their survival

The studies constitute a strong body of evidence that stingless bee populations are at risk of decline around the world due to threats including habitat loss, agrochemicals, competition for resources, climate change, and the introduction of exotic species, including pathogens.

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The studies constitute a strong body of evidence that stingless bee populations are at risk of decline around the world due to threats including habitat loss, agrochemicals, competition for resources, climate change, and the introduction of exotic species, including pathogens.

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Honey may act as an important reservoir for infective spores to initiate or perpetuate N. ceranae infections in honey bee colonies, and this work provides information that may help enhance current management recommendations for apiculturalists.

Occurrence of virus, microsporidia, and pesticide residues in three species of stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponini) in the field

The simultaneous occurrence of viruses and spores of the microsporidium N. ceranae in asymptomatic stingless bees, which suggest that these bees may be vectors of pathogens, is shown.

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Nosema bombi infections reduce the fecundity of the colony through detrimental physical effects to the reproductive organs in male bumblebees, increased mortality of workers, and negatively impacting PLOS PATHOGENS.

Wild bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombini) as a potential reservoir for bee pathogens in northeastern Argentina

If bumble bees are a potential reservoir for bee pathogens, this could lead to the development of Emerging Infection Diseases in wild bees, however, further studies are required to confirm this assumption and to determine the direction of the spillover between wild and managed bees.

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