North American velvet ants form one of the world’s largest known Müllerian mimicry complexes

@article{Wilson2015NorthAV,
  title={North American velvet ants form one of the world’s largest known M{\"u}llerian mimicry complexes},
  author={Joseph S. Wilson and Joshua P. Jahner and Matthew L. Forister and Erica S. Sheehan and Kevin Andrew Williams and James P. Pitts},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={25},
  pages={R704-R706}
}
Color mimicry is often celebrated as one of the most straightforward examples of evolution by natural selection, as striking morphological similarity between species evolves in response to a shared predation pressure. Recently, a large North American mimetic complex was described that included 65 species of Dasymutilla velvet ants (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae). Beyond those 65 species, little is known about how many species participate in this unique Müllerian complex, though several other… Expand
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