Normokalemic periodic paralysis is not a distinct disease

@article{Song2012NormokalemicPP,
  title={Normokalemic periodic paralysis is not a distinct disease},
  author={Young-Wha Song and Sung-Jo Kim and Tae-Hwe Heo and Man-Ho Kim and June-Bum Kim},
  journal={Muscle \& Nerve},
  year={2012},
  volume={46}
}
Introduction: Recent molecular studies of the original cases of normokalemic periodic paralysis (normoKPP) have raised suspicions that these families actually had hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP) due to mutations in the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene SCN4A. However, there is still a debate about the existence of normoKPP. Methods: We screened 230 individuals with primary periodic paralysis for mutations in the SCN4A, CACNA1S, and KCNJ2 genes. All patients had either a hyperKPP or… Expand
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