Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and the risk for Parkinson's disease

@article{Chen2005NonsteroidalAD,
  title={Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and the risk for Parkinson's disease},
  author={Honglei Chen and Eric J. Jacobs and Michael A Schwarzschild and Marjorie L McCullough and Eugenia E. Calle and Michael J. Thun and Alberto Ascherio},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2005},
  volume={58}
}
We investigated whether nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use was associated with a lower risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) in a large cohort of US men and women. PD risk was lower among ibuprofen users than nonusers. Compared with nonusers, the relative risks were 0.73 for users of fewer than 2 tablets/week, 0.72 for 2 to 6.9 tablets/week, and 0.62 for 1 or more tablets/day (p trend = 0.03). No association was found between the use of aspirin, other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or… 
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use and Essential Tremor
TLDR
The proportion of NSAID or aspirin users did not differ in ET cases or controls; yet interestingly, ibuprofen use was less inET cases than in controls, raising the possibility that ibup rofen use could have a potential protective role in ET.
Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Risk of Parkinson Disease
TLDR
The findings do not support the hypothesis that NSAIDs might decrease the risk of Parkinson disease, and the role of inflammatory processes in Parkinson disease remains unclear.
Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease
TLDR
The association between use of ibuprofen and lower PD risks, not shared by other NSAIDs or acetaminophen, suggests ib uprofen should be further investigated as a potential neuroprotective agent against PD.
NSAID use and the risk of Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
Current users of NSAIDs may be at a slightly higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease, and more studies are needed to confirm this finding.
Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of Parkinson’s disease: nested case-control study
TLDR
This case-control study did not find evidence that NSAID use reduces Parkinson’s disease risk, and positive associations observed might have been due to confounding by indication as the use was clustered in the few years before disease diagnosis.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of Parkinson’s disease in the elderly population: a meta-analysis
TLDR
There is no association between NSAIDs and the risk of Parkinson disease at the population level, and clinicians need to be vigilant ensuring that the use of NSAIDs remains restricted to their approved anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use and risk of Parkinson disease
TLDR
A dose–response meta-analysis showed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use was not associated with Parkinson disease risk, and the potency and the cumulative NSAIDs use did not play critical roles.
Anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of Parkinson disease
TLDR
There may be a protective effect of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use on risk of Parkinson disease (PD) consistent with a possible neuroinflammatory pathway in PD pathogenesis.
NSAID Use and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease
TLDR
Although the risk ratios of PD in male and female NSAID users were similar, the 95% CI for men was suggestive of a slight risk reduction, and ibuprofen may have a slight protective effect in lowering the risk of PD.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of Parkinson disease.
TLDR
Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that use of NSAIDs may delay or prevent the onset of PD.
Prospective study of caffeine consumption and risk of Parkinson's disease in men and women
TLDR
A possible protective effect of moderate doses of caffeine on risk of Parkinson's disease is supported, with the lowest risk observed at moderate intakes of coffee/day, or the third quintile of caffeine consumption.
Neuroinflammatory processes in Parkinson's disease
TLDR
It is proposed that, in PD, neuroinflammation plays a role in the cascade of events leading to nerve cell death, thus propagating the neurodegenerative process.
Cyclooxygenase-2 is instrumental in Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration
TLDR
It is demonstrated that targeting COX-2 does not protect against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration by mitigating inflammation, and evidence is provided that COx-2 inhibition prevents the formation of the oxidant species dopamine-quinone, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD.
Neuroprotection by Aspirin and Sodium Salicylate Through Blockade of NF-κB Activation
TLDR
At concentrations compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy, acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolite sodium salicylate were found to be protective against neurotoxicity elicited by the excitatory amino acid glutamate in rat primary neuronal cultures and hippocampal slices.
Anti-Inflammatory Drug Therapy Alters β-Amyloid Processing and Deposition in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease
TLDR
Data show that chronic NSAID treatment can reduce brain Aβ levels, amyloid plaque burden, and microglial activation in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.
Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
TLDR
Results suggest that M-5011 acts as a scavenger of .OH at sites with inflammatory lesions, and was the most potent drug among the NSAIDs tested regarding the scavenging activity of .
Neuroprotective effects of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs by direct scavenging of nitric oxide radicals
TLDR
The results suggest that the protective effects of the former four non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs against apoptosis might be mainly due to their direct nitric oxide radical scavenging activities in neuronal cells.
The Role of Glial Reaction and Inflammation in Parkinson's Disease
TLDR
Inhibition of the glial reaction and the inflammatory processes may represent a therapeutic target to reduce neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease.
...
...