Nonsteroidal antiandrogens: a therapeutic option for patients with advanced prostate cancer who wish to retain sexual interest and function

@article{Iversen2001NonsteroidalAA,
  title={Nonsteroidal antiandrogens: a therapeutic option for patients with advanced prostate cancer who wish to retain sexual interest and function},
  author={Peter Iversen and Ivan Melez{\'i}nek and A Schmidt},
  journal={BJU International},
  year={2001},
  volume={87}
}
The quality of life of men with prostate cancer is receiving increasing attention and, acknowledging that endocrine therapy conceptually remains a palliative treatment, many patients view the preservation of quality of life to be an equally important goal of therapy as the prolongation of survival [1]. The issue of quality of life is further emphasized by moves to initiate endocrine therapy earlier in the course of the disease and in younger men. Sexuality is an important aspect of quality of… 
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