Nonrandom location and orientation of the inactive X chromosome in human neutrophil nuclei

@article{Karni2001NonrandomLA,
  title={Nonrandom location and orientation of the inactive X chromosome in human neutrophil nuclei},
  author={Ron J. Karni and Lawrence J. Wangh and Aquiles J. Sanchez},
  journal={Chromosoma},
  year={2001},
  volume={110},
  pages={267-274}
}
Abstract. The nuclei of human neutrophils typically consist of a linear array of three or four lobes joined by DNA-containing filaments. Terminal lobes are connected to internal lobes via a single filament, while internal lobes have two filaments, each to an adjacent lobe. Some lobes also have appendages of various shapes and sizes. In particular, up to 17% of neutrophil nuclei of healthy women exhibit a drumstick-shaped appendage that contains the inactive X chromosome. This report provides a… Expand
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