Nonrandom Dispersal in Free-Ranging Vervet Monkeys: Social and Genetic Consequences

@article{Cheney1983NonrandomDI,
  title={Nonrandom Dispersal in Free-Ranging Vervet Monkeys: Social and Genetic Consequences},
  author={Dorothy L Cheney and Robert M. Seyfarth},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1983},
  volume={122},
  pages={392 - 412}
}
Male vervet monkeys in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, disperse nonrandomly from their natal groups at sexual maturity, and migrate to specific neighboring groups with their brothers or peers. Nonrandom dispersal in the company of allies appears to benefit young males by minimizing the risk of predation and reducing the probability of attack by resident males and females. Nonrandom dispersal also decreases the likelihood of mating with close female kin. Persistent nonrandom transfer, however… Expand
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