Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Machado2017NonsteroidalAD,
  title={Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Gustavo C Machado and Christopher G. Maher and Paulo Henrique Ferreira and Richard Osborne Day and Marina B. Pinheiro and Manuela Loureiro Ferreira},
  journal={Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  year={2017},
  volume={76},
  pages={1269 - 1278}
}
Background While it is now clear that paracetamol is ineffective for spinal pain, there is not consensus on the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for this condition. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs for spinal pain. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and LILACS for randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs with placebo for spinal pain. Reviewers extracted… 
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