Non-respiratory podia of clypeasteroids (Echinodermata, Echinoides)

@article{Mooi2004NonrespiratoryPO,
  title={Non-respiratory podia of clypeasteroids (Echinodermata, Echinoides)},
  author={Rich Mooi},
  journal={Zoomorphology},
  year={2004},
  volume={106},
  pages={21-30}
}
  • R. Mooi
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Zoomorphology
SummaryThe podia found in the Order Clypeasteroida are composed of three basic systems: (1) a specialized external epithelium, (2) a connective tissue sheath enclosing a hydrostatic skeleton, (3) an intrinsic smooth muscle system. The components of each system are described using histology and scanning electron microscopy and their particular functions are elucidated. The external epithelium is specialized at the tip and supports short cilia on the disk and diaphragm, and long cilia on the… 
Non-respiratory podia of clypeasteroids (Echinodermata, Echinoides): II. Diversity
TLDR
The anatomy and distribution of podia on the oral surface of scutellines supports the fact that this surface is the prime food collecting area in all true sand dollars.
Functional morphology of coronal and peristomeal podia in Sphaerechinus granularis (Echinodermata, Echinoida)
TLDR
This model of adhesion/de-adhesion fits well with the activities of both coronal and peristomeal podia, which are anchoring (adhering) appendages involved in either locomotion or capture of drift materials.
Structure and function of clypeasteroid miliary spines (Echinodermata, Echinoides)
TLDR
Histological and ultrastructural techniques have been used to describe the functional morphology of clypeasteroid miliary spines, with special reference to their supposed mucus-secreting role, and allometry of spines from Echinarachnius parma suggests that aboral military spines and club-shaped spines exhibit co-ordinated growth that maintains the aboral canopy throughout post-metamorphic ontogeny.
Ecology of clypeasteroids
Embryonic, Larval, and Juvenile Development of the Sea Biscuit Clypeaster subdepressus (Echinodermata: Clypeasteroida)
TLDR
Track the morphogenesis of early juveniles is a necessary step to elucidate the developmental mechanisms of echinoid growth and important groundwork to clarify homologies between irregular urchins.
Echinoderms don’t suck: evidence against the involvement of suction in tube foot attachment*
TLDR
Results clearly show that echinoderm tube feet rely on adhesive secretions and not on suction, as well as asteroids and echinoid tube foot attachment.
Phylogenetic re-evaluation of fossil and extant micro-echinoids with revision of Tridium, Cyamidia, and Lenicyamidia (Echinoidea: Clypeasteroida).
TLDR
During these analyses, new data were uncovered for two additional enigmatic, fibulariid taxa, Leniechinus herricki Kier, 1968 (Middle Eocene, North America), and Lenicyamidia compta Brunnschweiler, 1962 (Eocene, Western Australia).
Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals
TLDR
It is shown that temporary adhesion of benthic animals is affected by three structural levels: the adhesive secretions provide binding to the substrate at a molecular scale, whereas surface geometry and external morphology increase the contact area with the irregular and unpredictable profile of the substratum from micro‐ to macroscales.
New record of the Six-holed Keyhole Urchin, Leodia sexiesperforata (Leske, 1778) (Clypeasteroida, Mellitidae), from the Brazilian coast, with an updated distribution map
TLDR
Leodia sexiesperforata has a continuous range between the states of Ceara and Alagoas and this new report fills a distribution gap on the coast of northeastern Brazil.
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References

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TLDR
The anatomy and distribution of podia on the oral surface of scutellines supports the fact that this surface is the prime food collecting area in all true sand dollars.
FEEDING STRUCTURES, BEHAVIOR, AND MICROHABITAT OF ECHINOCYAMUS PUSILLUS (ECHINOIDEA: CLYPEASTEROIDA).
TLDR
The evidence presented supports the view that it is specialized rather than primitive, the species is highly adapted for nestling in the interstices between relatively large pebbles and the feeding mechanism is atypical for clypeasteroids.
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TLDR
The histology of the suckered and peristomial tube-feet of the two regular echinoids Cidaris cidaris (Cidaroidsa) and Echinus esculentus (Diadematoida) is described and a respiratory function for Stewart9s organs in the Cidaroida is suggested.
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TLDR
The morphology of the podia and ampullae of thirty echinoids spread over 7 orders is described and it is shown that all podia having the first three adaptations are favorably positioned on the animal for respiration.
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TLDR
The penicillate tube-feet, all superficially similar, are shown to possess histological differences which reflect their function: the burrow-building tube- feet (dorsal and sub-anal), which plaster mucus on to theBurrow walls, possess mucus glands surrounded by a basket work of muscle-fibres for more efficient discharge.
Ultrastructure of the tube foot sucker of a regular echinoid,Diadema antillarum Philippi, with especial reference to secretory cells
  • R. Coleman
  • Biology
    Zeitschrift für Zellforschung und Mikroskopische Anatomie
  • 2004
TLDR
Suckers of principal tube feet of a regular echinoid,Diadema antillarum, are described in an electron microscopic study and a granule-filled secretory cell-type is described that possesses long tracts down which the granules pass to terminate on the contact edge of the sucker in secretion packets.
The Histology and Activities of the Tube-feet of Echinocyamus pusillus
TLDR
The histology of the suckered, buccal sensory, and respiratory tube-feet and their ampullae, where they occur, of the clypeasteroid sea-urchin Echinocyamus pusillus is described and this urchin is shown to share some features with the regular urchins and others with the spatangoids.
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TLDR
The discussion considers the possible significance of this widespread, specific and apparently non-pathologic association between echinoderms and their subcuticular bacteria.
Ultrastructure of sea urchin tube feet
TLDR
An analysis of the ultrastructure of the tube feet of three species of sea urchins revealed that the smooth muscle, although known to be cholinoceptive, receives no motor innervation.
Ultrastructure of the coelomic lining in the podium of the starfish Stylasterias forreri
TLDR
It is concluded that the coelomic lining in the podium of S. forreri is a bipartite epithelium and that the retractor cells of the podium are myoepithelial in nature.
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