Non-random associations of graphemes to colours in synaesthetic and non-synaesthetic populations

@article{Simner2005NonrandomAO,
  title={Non-random associations of graphemes to colours in synaesthetic and non-synaesthetic populations},
  author={Julia Simner and Jamie Ward and Monika Lanz and Ashok Jansari and Krist A. Noonan and Louise Glover and David A. Oakley},
  journal={Cognitive Neuropsychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={22},
  pages={1069 - 1085}
}
This study shows that biases exist in the associations of letters with colours across individuals both with and without grapheme-colour synaesthesia. A group of grapheme-colour synaesthetes were significantly more consistent over time in their choice of colours than a group of controls. Despite this difference, there were remarkable inter-subject agreements, both within and across participant groups (e.g., a tends to be red, b tends to be blue, c tends to be yellow). This suggests that grapheme… Expand

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