Non-lethal mouse repellents: evaluation of cinnamamide as a repellent against commensal and field rodents

@article{Gurney1996NonlethalMR,
  title={Non-lethal mouse repellents: evaluation of cinnamamide as a repellent against commensal and field rodents},
  author={Joanne E. Gurney and Richard W. Watkins and E. Leonard Gill and David P. Cowan},
  journal={Applied Animal Behaviour Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={49},
  pages={353-363}
}
Abstract Cinnamamide, a non-lethal repellent, deters feeding by a wide range of avian species. We investigated the potential of cinnamamide as a repellent for house mice ( Mus musculus ) and wood mice ( Apodemus sylvaticus ), using a 3 day, ‘short-term no-choice test'. Both species were presented with cinnamamide-treated food at 0.8% w/w. After an initial sampling period, both the house mice and wood mice reduced their consumption of cinnamamide-treated food to 32% and 17%, respectively, of… Expand
Taste-aversion conditioning of house mice (Mus domesticus) using the non-lethal repellent, cinnamamide
Abstract The potential of cinnamamide, a non-lethal repellent, to induce a conditioned taste aversion in house mice ( Mus domesticus ) was investigated. Mice were presented with saccharin solution,Expand
Cinnamamide: A Nonlethal Chemical Repellent for Birds and Mammals
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Past and current laboratory and field studies in which cinnamarnide is shown to deter feeding by problem birds, and mammalian pests, such as the Norway rat, house mouse, and European rabbit are reviewed. Expand
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The dose-response curve was quantified for the avian repellency of cinnamamide, a derivative of the plant secondary compound cinnamic acid, using a three-day, 'short-term no-choice' test. This testExpand
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