Non-directional motion detectors can be used to mimic optic flow dependent behaviors

@article{Dyhr2010NondirectionalMD,
  title={Non-directional motion detectors can be used to mimic optic flow dependent behaviors},
  author={Jonathan P. Dyhr and Charles M. Higgins},
  journal={Biological Cybernetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={103},
  pages={433-446}
}
Insect navigational behaviors including obstacle avoidance, grazing landings, and visual odometry are dependent on the ability to estimate flight speed based only on visual cues. In honeybees, this visual estimate of speed is largely independent of both the direction of motion and the spatial frequency content of the image. Electrophysiological recordings from the motion-sensitive cells believed to underlie these behaviors have long supported spatio-temporally tuned correlation-type models of… CONTINUE READING

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 26 references

Non-directional motion may underlie insect behavioral dependence on image speed

C Higgins
Biol Cybern • 2004
View 8 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Visual motion detection circuits in flies: peripheral motion computation by identified small-field retinotopic neurons.

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience • 1995
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Principles of visual motion detection.

Trends in neurosciences • 1989
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

A model of visual detection of angular speed for bees.

Journal of theoretical biology • 2009
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Honeybee navigation: properties of the visually driven 'odometer'.

The Journal of experimental biology • 2003
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Honeybee navigation en route to the goal: visual flight control and odometry

The Journal of experimental biology • 1996
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…