Non-breeding feather concentrations of testosterone, corticosterone and cortisol are associated with subsequent survival in wild house sparrows.

@article{Koren2012NonbreedingFC,
  title={Non-breeding feather concentrations of testosterone, corticosterone and cortisol are associated with subsequent survival in wild house sparrows.},
  author={Lee Koren and Shinichi Nakagawa and Terry Burke and Kiran K. Soma and Katherine E. Wynne-Edwards and Eli Geffen},
  journal={Proceedings. Biological sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={279 1733},
  pages={1560-6}
}
Potential mechanistic mediators of Darwinian fitness, such as stress hormones or sex hormones, have been the focus of many studies. An inverse relationship between fitness and stress or sex hormone concentrations has been widely assumed, although empirical evidence is scarce. Feathers gradually accumulate hormones during their growth and provide a novel way to measure hormone concentrations integrated over time. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we measured testosterone… CONTINUE READING
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