Non-ablative fractional resurfacing in combination with topical tretinoin cream as a field treatment modality for multiple actinic keratosis: a pilot study and a review of other field treatment modalities

@article{Prens2013NonablativeFR,
  title={Non-ablative fractional resurfacing in combination with topical tretinoin cream as a field treatment modality for multiple actinic keratosis: a pilot study and a review of other field treatment modalities},
  author={Sebastiaan P Prens and Karin de Vries and Hendrik Arent Martino Neumann and Errol P. Prens},
  journal={Journal of Dermatological Treatment},
  year={2013},
  volume={24},
  pages={227 - 231}
}
Background: Actinic keratoses (AK) are premalignant lesions occurring mainly in sun-damaged skin. Current topical treatment options for AK and photo-damaged skin such as liquid nitrogen and electrosurgery are not suitable for field treatment. Otherwise, therapies suitable for field treatment bring along considerable patient discomfort. Non-ablative fractional resurfacing has emerged as a logical treatment option especially for field treatment of AK. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical efficacy… 
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Background  Actinic keratoses (AK) frequently occur on sun‐exposed skin and are considered as in situ squamous cell carcinoma. To date, no treatment algorithm exists for first or second line
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