Non-Consensual Treatment is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible

@article{Cherry2010NonConsensualTI,
  title={Non-Consensual Treatment is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible},
  author={M. Cherry},
  journal={The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics},
  year={2010},
  volume={38},
  pages={789 - 798}
}
  • M. Cherry
  • Published 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
Commentators routinely urge that it is morally permissible forcibly to treat psychiatric patients (1) to preserve the patient's best interests and (2) to restore the patient's autonomy. Such arguments specify duties of beneficence toward others, while appreciating personal autonomy as a positive value to be weighted against other factors. Varying by jurisdiction, legal statutes usually require, in addition, at least (3) that there exists the threat of harm to self or others. In this paper, I… Expand
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