Noise Exposure, Characterization, and Comparison of Three Football Stadiums

@article{Engard2010NoiseEC,
  title={Noise Exposure, Characterization, and Comparison of Three Football Stadiums},
  author={Derek J Engard and Delvin R. Sandfort and Robert W. Gotshall and William Brazile},
  journal={Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene},
  year={2010},
  volume={7},
  pages={616 - 621}
}
Personal noise exposure samples were collected from five workers at a large-sized college football stadium and five workers at a medium-sized college football stadium in northern Colorado during three home football games, for a total of 30 personal noise exposures. In addition, personal noise exposure samples were collected from five fans at a National Football League (NFL) stadium, and from two fans at each of the college stadiums during three home football games, for a total of 27 personal… 
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