Noise‐enhanced balance control in patients with diabetes and patients with stroke

@article{Priplata2006NoiseenhancedBC,
  title={Noise‐enhanced balance control in patients with diabetes and patients with stroke},
  author={Attila Priplata and Benjamin L. Patritti and James B. Niemi and Richard Hughes and Denise C. Gravelle and Lewis A. Lipsitz and Aristidis Veves and Joel Stein and Paolo Bonato and J. J. Collins},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2006},
  volume={59}
}
Somatosensory function declines with diabetic neuropathy and often with stroke, resulting in diminished motor performance. Recently, it has been shown that input noise can enhance human sensorimotor function. The goal of this study was to investigate whether subsensory mechanical noise applied to the soles of the feet via vibrating insoles can be used to improve quiet‐standing balance control in 15 patients with diabetic neuropathy and 15 patients with stroke. Sway data of 12 healthy elderly… Expand
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