Nodes and networks in the neural architecture for language: Broca's region and beyond

@article{Hagoort2014NodesAN,
  title={Nodes and networks in the neural architecture for language: Broca's region and beyond},
  author={Peter Hagoort},
  journal={Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={28},
  pages={136-141}
}
  • P. Hagoort
  • Published 1 October 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Current views on the neurobiological underpinnings of language are discussed that deviate in a number of ways from the classical Wernicke-Lichtheim-Geschwind model. More areas than Broca's and Wernicke's region are involved in language. Moreover, a division along the axis of language production and language comprehension does not seem to be warranted. Instead, for central aspects of language processing neural infrastructure is shared between production and comprehension. Three different… 
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