No net insect abundance and diversity declines across US Long Term Ecological Research sites

@article{Crossley2020NoNI,
  title={No net insect abundance and diversity declines across US Long Term Ecological Research sites},
  author={Michael S. Crossley and Amanda R. Meier and Emily M. Baldwin and Lauren L Berry and Leah C. Crenshaw and Glen L. Hartman and Doris Lagos-Kutz and David H Nichols and Krishna Patel and Sofia Varriano and William E. Snyder and Matthew D. Moran},
  journal={Nature Ecology \& Evolution},
  year={2020},
  pages={1-9}
}
Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect abundance suggest grave consequences for global ecosystems and human society. Most evidence comes from Europe, however, leaving uncertainty about insect population trends worldwide. We used >5,300 time series for insects and other arthropods, collected over 4–36 years at monitoring sites representing 68 different natural and managed areas, to search for evidence of declines across the United States. Some taxa and sites showed decreases in abundance… 
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