No evidence of the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain or enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) found in cattle faeces in northern Germany, the hotspot of the 2011 HUS outbreak area

@article{Wieler2011NoEO,
  title={No evidence of the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain or enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) found in cattle faeces in northern Germany, the hotspot of the 2011 HUS outbreak area},
  author={Lothar H. Wieler and Torsten Semmler and Inga Eichhorn and Esther-Maria Ant{\~a}o and Bianca Kinnemann and Lutz Geue and Helge Karch and Sebastian Guenther and Astrid Bethe},
  journal={Gut Pathogens},
  year={2011},
  volume={3},
  pages={17 - 17}
}
BackgroundRuminants, in particular bovines, are the primary reservoir of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), but whole genome analyses of the current German ESBL-producing O104:H4 outbreak strain of sequence type (ST) 678 showed this strain to be highly similar to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC). Strains of the EAEC pathotype are basically adapted to the human host. To clarify whether in contrast to this paradigm, the O104:H4 outbreak strain and/or EAEC may also be able to colonize ruminants… Expand
Escherichia coli O104:H4 Pathogenesis: an Enteroaggregative E. coli/Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Explosive Cocktail of High Virulence.
TLDR
Se sequencing studies showed that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga toxin-producing EAEC O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak of hemorrhagic diarrhea, and the role these virulence factors could have in EAEC/EHEC O 104: H4 pathogenesis is discussed. Expand
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Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O104:H4: a New Challenge for Microbiology
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An overview of the epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, and molecular biological data available on the 2011 German EHEC O104:H4 outbreak is presented. Expand
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