No Time To Eat: An Adaptationist Account Of Periovulatory Behavioral Changes

@article{Fessler2003NoTT,
  title={No Time To Eat: An Adaptationist Account Of Periovulatory Behavioral Changes},
  author={Daniel M. T. Fessler},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={78},
  pages={3 - 21}
}
  • D. M. Fessler
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
A comprehensive review of women’s dietary behavior across the menstrual cycle suggests a drop in caloric intake around the time of ovulation; similar patterns occur in many other mammals. The periovulatory nadir is puzzling, as it is not explicable in terms of changes in the energy budget. Existing explanations in the animal literature operate wholly at the proximate level of analysis and hence do not address this puzzle. In this paper, I offer an ultimate explanation for the periovulatory… Expand
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