No Homelike Place: The Lesson of History in Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World

@article{Wright2014NoHP,
  title={No Homelike Place: The Lesson of History in Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World},
  author={T. Wright},
  journal={Contemporary Literature},
  year={2014},
  volume={55},
  pages={58-88}
}
  • T. Wright
  • Published 2014
  • History
  • Contemporary Literature
  • Early in Kazuo Ishiguro’s first novel, A Pale View of Hills (1982), the narrator Etsuko makes a grim admission. Her eldest daughter, brought to England as a child when Etsuko left Japan after the war, is several years dead. Never able to adjust to her new country, without friends, she has taken her own life, her body hanging undiscovered in her Manchester bedsit for several days. “The horror of that image has never diminished,” says Etsuko, “but it has long ceased to be a morbid matter; as with… CONTINUE READING
    2 Citations
    Psychological disorder and narrative order in Kazuo Ishiguro's novels
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