No Arithmetic Cyclic Quadrilaterals

@article{Beauregard2006NoAC,
  title={No Arithmetic Cyclic Quadrilaterals},
  author={Raymond A. Beauregard},
  journal={The College Mathematics Journal},
  year={2006},
  volume={37},
  pages={110 - 113}
}
  • R. Beauregard
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • Education
  • The College Mathematics Journal
Ray Beauregard (beau@math.uri.edu) received his B.A. from Providence College in 1964 and his Ph.D. in 1968 (under the guidance of Richard E. Johnson) from the University of New Hampshire. He has spent his entire career at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, Rl 02881). He and John Fraleigh are the co-authors of a textbook, Linear Algebra, currently in its third edition. Although most of his research has been in ring theory, he has recently become interested in elementary number theory. His… 
2 Citations

Diametric Quadrilaterals with Two Equal Sides

Ray Beauregard (beau@math.uri.edu) received his B.A. from Providence College in 1964 and his Ph.D. in 1968 (under the guidance of Richard E. Johnson) from the University of New Hampshire. He has

Diametric Quadrilaterals with Two Equal Sides.

(2009). Diametric Quadrilaterals with Two Equal Sides. The College Mathematics Journal: Vol. 40, No. 1, pp. 17-21.

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