Nitrous oxide in emergency medicine.

@article{Osullivan2003NitrousOI,
  title={Nitrous oxide in emergency medicine.},
  author={Iomhar O'sullivan and Jonathan. Benger},
  journal={Emergency medicine journal : EMJ},
  year={2003},
  volume={20 3},
  pages={
          214-7
        }
}
Safe and predictable analgesia is required for the potentially painful or uncomfortable procedures often undertaken in an emergency department. The characteristics of an ideal analgesic agent are safety, predictability, non-invasive delivery, freedom from side effects, simplicity of use, and a rapid onset and offset. Newer approaches have threatened the widespread use of nitrous oxide, but despite its long history this simple gas still has much to offer. "I am sure the air in heaven must be… CONTINUE READING

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