Nitrous oxide anxiolytic effect in mice in the elevated plus maze: Mediation by benzodiazepine receptors

@article{Emmanouil2005NitrousOA,
  title={Nitrous oxide anxiolytic effect in mice in the elevated plus maze: Mediation by benzodiazepine receptors},
  author={Dimitrios Emmanouil and C. H. Johnson and Raymond M. Quock},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2005},
  volume={115},
  pages={167-172}
}
In earlier research, we have hypothesized that exposure to nitrous oxide (N2O) produces an anxiolytic effect that is mediated by benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors. The present research was conducted to characterize pharmacologically the behavioral effects of N2O in comparison with a BZ standard, chlordiazepoxide (CP), in the mouse elevated plus maze. Exposure to increasing levels of N2O produced a concentration-related increase in the percent of total entries into and the percent of total time… Expand
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