Nitrogen fixation in biological soil crusts from southeast Utah, USA

@article{Belnap2002NitrogenFI,
  title={Nitrogen fixation in biological soil crusts from southeast Utah, USA},
  author={Jayne Belnap},
  journal={Biology and Fertility of Soils},
  year={2002},
  volume={35},
  pages={128-135}
}
  • J. Belnap
  • Published 1 April 2002
  • Environmental Science
  • Biology and Fertility of Soils
Abstract. Biological soil crusts can be the dominant source of N for arid land ecosystems. We measured potential N fixation rates biweekly for 2 years, using three types of soil crusts: (1) crusts whose directly counted cells were >98% Microcoleus vaginatus (light crusts); (2) crusts dominated by M. vaginatus, but with 20% or more of the directly counted cells represented by Nostoc commune and Scytonema myochrous (dark crusts); and (3) the soil lichen Collema sp. At all observation times… 
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  • J. Belnap
  • Environmental Science
    Biology and Fertility of Soils
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TLDR
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