Nicotine-induced upregulation of native neuronal nicotinic receptors is caused by multiple mechanisms.

@article{Govind2012NicotineinducedUO,
  title={Nicotine-induced upregulation of native neuronal nicotinic receptors is caused by multiple mechanisms.},
  author={Anitha P Govind and Heather Walsh and William N Green},
  journal={The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
  year={2012},
  volume={32 6},
  pages={
          2227-38
        }
}
Nicotine causes changes in brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) during smoking that initiate addiction. Nicotine-induced upregulation is the long-lasting increase in nAChR radioligand binding sites in brain resulting from exposure. The mechanisms causing upregulation are not established. Many different mechanisms have been reported with the assumption that there is a single underlying cause. Using live rat cortical neurons, we examined for the first time how exposure and withdrawal… CONTINUE READING

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