Nickel, cobalt and chromium in consumer products: a role in allergic contact dermatitis?

@article{Basketter1993NickelCA,
  title={Nickel, cobalt and chromium in consumer products: a role in allergic contact dermatitis?},
  author={David A Basketter and G. Briatico-Vangosa and Werner Kaestner and C. Lally and W. J. Bontinck},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={1993},
  volume={28}
}
In spite of the improved awareness of the potential for nickel, cobalt and chromium to en use skin allergy, the incidence of serialization to them is generally on the increase, especially for nickel. We review data from the literature and industry on transition metal contamination of consumer products and assess the hazard to man. Consumer products are defined as personal care items and detergent/cleaning products used regularly in domestic York. The analytical data demonstrate that consumer… 
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TLDR
The many faces of the nickel allergy are described to find out different diagnostic, potential strategies for treatment and prevention in hypersensitized patients and proposed recommendations to the dermatologist, general practitioner, and the allergist were prepared.
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