Nickel, chromium and cobalt in consumer products: revisiting safe levels in the new millennium

@article{Basketter2003NickelCA,
  title={Nickel, chromium and cobalt in consumer products: revisiting safe levels in the new millennium},
  author={David A Basketter and Gianni D. Angelini and Arieh Ingber and Petra S. Kern and Torkil Menn{\'e}},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2003},
  volume={49}
}
The transition metals nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) are common causes of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Given the high frequency with which these allergens can be associated with hand eczema in those responsible for domestic work, it has been suggested that contamination of household consumer products with these metals may be of relevance to the causation/chronicity of hand dermatitis. Dose–response studies using 48 h occlusive patch test conditions in sensitized individuals… 
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