Ngā Whakāwhitinga (standing at the crossroads): How Māori understand what Western psychiatry calls “schizophrenia”

@article{Taitimu2018NgW,
  title={Ngā Whakāwhitinga (standing at the crossroads): How Māori understand what Western psychiatry calls “schizophrenia”},
  author={Melissa Taitimu and J. Read and T. Mcintosh},
  journal={Transcultural Psychiatry},
  year={2018},
  volume={55},
  pages={153 - 177}
}
This project explored how Māori understand experiences commonly labelled “schizophrenic” or “psychotic”. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 57 Māori participants who had either personal experiences labelled as “psychosis” or “schizophrenia”, or who work with people with such experiences; including tangata whaiora (users of mental health services), tohunga (traditional healers), kaumatua/kuia (elders), Māori clinicians, cultural support workers and students. Kaupapa Māori Theory and… Expand
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