Next generation phylogeography of cave and surface Astyanax mexicanus.

@article{Coghill2014NextGP,
  title={Next generation phylogeography of cave and surface Astyanax mexicanus.},
  author={Lyndon M. Coghill and C Darrin Hulsey and Johel Chaves-Campos and Francisco Javier Garc{\'i}a de Le{\'o}n and Steven G. Johnson},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2014},
  volume={79},
  pages={
          368-74
        }
}
Evidence for late Pleistocene origin of Astyanax mexicanus cavefish
TLDR
A recent origin of cave populations is strongly supported by analyses of independent sets of nuclear DNA polymorphism, and the observation of two divergent haplogroups of mitochondrial and nuclear genes with different geographic distributions support a recent admixture of three divergent surface populations.
Phylogeny and Evolutionary History of Astyanax mexicanus
TLDR
The troglobite populations of the genus Astyanax inhabiting the Huasteca region, located in the Sierra Madre Oriental, in northeastern Mexico, corresponds to one of the most studied fish groups because it represents an outstanding opportunity to study local adaptation and trait evolution.
The rise of Astyanax cavefish
TLDR
The rise of this model system from its discovery by a Mexican surveyor in 1936 to a powerful system for cave biology and contemporary genetic research is documented, which has provided insight to the mechanisms of phenotypic regression, the genetic basis for constructive trait evolution, and the origin of behavioral novelties.
The role of gene flow in rapid and repeated evolution of cave‐related traits in Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus
TLDR
The study shows that gene flow must be considered in studies of independent, repeated trait evolution, and shows that a key trogolomorphic phenotype QTL is enriched for genomic regions with low divergence between caves, suggesting that regions important for cave phenotypes may be transferred between caves via gene flow.
The role of gene flow in rapid and repeated evolution of cave related traits in Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus
TLDR
This study resequenced and analyzed nearly 50 whole genomes of the Mexican tetra to show that shared evolutionary history via gene flow must be considered in studies of independent, repeated trait evolution, and shows that a key QTL is enriched for genomic regions with very low divergence between caves.
Cave‐adapted evolution in the North American amblyopsid fishes inferred using phylogenomics and geometric morphometrics
TLDR
Using ancestral state reconstruction, this work finds support for at least two independent subterranean colonization events within the Amblyopsidae, and reconstruct evolutionary relationships using ultraconserved element loci, estimate the ancestral histories of eye‐state, and examine the impact of cave adaptation on body shape evolution.
Complexity of Interrelationship Between Astyanax Cave and Surface Fish
TLDR
It is suggested that the introgressed modern haplotypes in the SEP Pachon and Yerbaniz cave fish derive from VEP cave populations, which were well adapted to cave life and therefore able to co-exist and also to hybridize with theSEP cave populations after the cave systems merged due to karst erosion.
Structure and Genetics of Cave Populations
TLDR
Gene pools of young cave populations often show strong exogenous imprints such as multiple colonization events and/or recurring gene flow from the surface, compatible with the high propagule pressure hypothesis of successful biological invasions, while convincing molecular evidence for the genetic bottleneck hypothesis of cave colonization is sparse.
On the evolutionary origin of Neotropical cavefish Ancistrus cryptophthalmus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) based on the mitogenome and genetic structure of cave and surface populations
TLDR
It is suggested that the evolution of stygomorphisms observed in A. cryptophthalmus may be the result of morphologic modification, by natural selection, of Ancistrus sp.
Surface and Cave Populations of Mexican Astyanax
The Neotropic large-eyed and well-pigmented diurnal characid fish Astyanax has developed a series of cave populations in Northeastern Mexico. These divide morphologically into a group of strongly
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TLDR
It is shown that cave forms originated from at least two distinct ancestral surface-dwelling stocks over the past several million years, and each stock gave rise to multiple invasions of the subterranean biotope.
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TLDR
The microsatellite data provide evidence that two co-occurring groups with small sunken eyes and externally visible eyes, respectively, differentiated within the partly lightened Caballo Moro karst window cave and might represent an example for incipient sympatric speciation.
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The similar cave phenotypes found in these caves are the result of repeated convergences in spite of gene flow from surface populations suggesting either strong natural or sexual selection for alleles responsible for the cave phenotype in the cave environment.
Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele
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The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon.
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Nested clade analyses show that recurrent gene flow as well as historic processes like past fragmentation and range expansion have influenced current populations of A. fasciatus in Central and North America.
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The generation of a genome-wide linkage map is described to allow quantitative trait analysis of evolutionarily derived morphologies in the Mexican cave tetra, a species that has, in a series of independent caves, repeatedly evolved specialized characteristics adapted to a unique and well-studied ecological environment.
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TLDR
The genic character and degree of variability in troglobitic and epigean populations of the characid fish Astyanax mexicanus in Mexico are compared to show the impact of climatic changes associated with glaciation on population genetics.
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TLDR
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TLDR
An analysis of variation in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase 2 (ND2) gene among different surface fish and cavefish populations identifies a minimum of two genetically distinctive cavefish lineages with similar eyeless phenotypes.
Population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data challenge the mitochondrial DNA based taxonomy of Astyanax in Mexico (Characidae, Teleostei).
TLDR
Analysis of correlations of population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data and phylogeographic patterns shown by mitochondrial DNA sequences in Mexican cave and surface fish of the genus Astyanax to improve the understanding of the colonization history of this neotropical fish to assess a recent taxonomic classification indicates neither the nuclear genotypic clusters nor the mitochondrial clades represent independent evolutionary units.
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