Newsletter 143 conencab(Qx)

Abstract

Firm specific, idiosyncratic knowledge is increasingly being recognized as a possible source of competitive advantage in today’s business world, where more traditional sources seem to be becoming less effective, so that new approaches to strategy theory and even to the theory of the firm have been suggested. This is routinely confirmed by the preliminary results of an ongoing study of KM approaches and practices used in Spanish firms. In this study, several senior management respondents unambiguously consider firm specific knowledge very important for their firms’ competitiveness, although they recognize, not surprisingly, that general purpose knowledge is also needed and in a higher proportion. However, when the specific knowledge management (KM) practices used are analyzed, it turns out that the majority of them do not seem to be particularly well geared to firm specific knowledge development and usage, while the associated learning activities and processes are not always effective. This suggests what could be a fundamental mismatch between the type of knowledge involved and appropriate KM practices. In this paper we present preliminary evidence stemming from the aforementioned study, make an attempt to characterize the kind of mismatches detected, and suggest ideas for further research on the practical and theoretical implications of the results obtained. Miguel A. Ariño Roberto García “Managerial decision making and long-term effectiveness”, Effective Executive, special issue on Decision Making, Vol. XI No 5, May 2008, pages 10-17. Abstract: In this article, we argue that one of the main sustainable competitive advantages of any company is the way it is managed. The performance of a company depends on many variables, including the external environment, the industry in which the company competes, its strategic positioning within the industry, etc. These factors are not company-specific, however, so they cannot account for differences in performance across companies. What is specific to a company is its management and its managerial decision-making process. Addressing this fact, Bartlett and Ghoshal (1994) have proposed that academia should rebuild the bridge between managerial action and the quality of an organization. Our purpose here is to establish the relationship between the actual decision-making process, on the one hand, and the quality of an organization and its long-term performance, on the other. We present a managerial decision-making model that establishes the characteristics a decision must have in order to be effective. These characteristics are: operationality, instrumentality and validity. Effective decision making, however, does not guarantee long-term organizational effectiveness. For long-term effectiveness, management must take into account the organizational learning that decisions bring about in the organization’s members. We argue that such learning can be either operational or relational. Javier Estrada “Fundamental indexation and international diversification”, The Journal of Portfolio Management, Vol. 34, No 3, Spring 2008, pages 93-109. Abstract: Just as fundamental indexation is novel and controversial, international diversification is traditional and widely accepted. In this article, the author links both issues and evaluates a fundamental strategy Just as fundamental indexation is novel and controversial, international diversification is traditional and widely accepted. In this article, the author links both issues and evaluates a fundamental strategy of international diversification. Considering 16 country benchmarks that make up over 93% of world market capitalization and a 32-year Page

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Andreu2008Newsletter1C, title={Newsletter 143 conencab(Qx)}, author={Rafael Andreu and Juan Baiget and Miguel {\'A}ngel Ari{\~n}o and Roberto Garc{\'i}a and Javier Estrada}, year={2008} }