News from the west: ancient DNA from a French megalithic burial chamber.

@article{Deguilloux2011NewsFT,
  title={News from the west: ancient DNA from a French megalithic burial chamber.},
  author={M. Deguilloux and Ludovic Soler and M. Pemonge and C. Scarre and Roger Joussaume and L. Laporte},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2011},
  volume={144 1},
  pages={
          108-18
        }
}
Recent paleogenetic studies have confirmed that the spread of the Neolithic across Europe was neither genetically nor geographically uniform. To extend existing knowledge of the mitochondrial European Neolithic gene pool, we examined six samples of human skeletal material from a French megalithic long mound (c.4200 cal BC). We retrieved HVR-I sequences from three individuals and demonstrated that in the Neolithic period the mtDNA haplogroup N1a, previously only known in central Europe, was as… Expand

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