Corpus ID: 34262935

Newborn skin: Part II. Birthmarks.

@article{Mclaughlin2008NewbornSP,
  title={Newborn skin: Part II. Birthmarks.},
  author={M. Mclaughlin and Nina R O'Connor and Peter S Ham},
  journal={American family physician},
  year={2008},
  volume={77 1},
  pages={
          56-60
        }
}
Birthmarks in newborns are common sources of parental concern. Although most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion, limited evidence exists to guide management of these conditions. Large congenital melanocytic nevi require evaluation for removal, whereas smaller nevi may be observed for malignant changes. With few exceptions, benign birthmarks (e.g., dermal melanosis, hemangioma of infancy, port-wine stain, nevus simplex) do not require treatment; however, effective cosmetic… Expand
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  • Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology
  • 2013
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