New remains of primitive ruminants from Thailand: evidence of the early evolution of the Ruminantia in Asia

@article{Mtais2001NewRO,
  title={New remains of primitive ruminants from Thailand: evidence of the early evolution of the Ruminantia in Asia},
  author={Gr{\'e}goire M{\'e}tais and Yaowalak Chaimanee and Jean-Jacques Jaeger and St{\'e}phane Ducrocq},
  journal={Zoologica Scripta},
  year={2001},
  volume={30}
}
A new tragulid, Archaeotragulus krabiensis, gen. n. et sp. n., is described from the late Eocene Krabi Basin (south Thailand). It represents the oldest occurrence of the family which was previously unknown prior to the Miocene. Archaeotragulus displays a mixture of primitive and derived characters, together with the M structure on the trigonid, which appears to be the main dental autapomorphy of the family. We also report the occurrence at Krabi of a new Lophiomerycid, Krabimeryx primitivus… 
Eocene bunoselenodont Artiodactyla from southern Thailand and the early evolution of Ruminantia in South Asia
TLDR
Dental remains of a new bunoselenodont artiodactyl are described from the late Eocene of Krabi, southern Thailand, adding to the Eocene record of early ruminants and lends support to the hypothesis that the Tragulidae represents one of the first offshoots in the evolutionary history of Ruminantia.
A new primitive alligatorine from the Eocene of Thailand: relevance of Asiatic members to the radiation of the group
TLDR
Results indicate a close relationship of the new alligatorine taxon to Procaimanoidea, Arambourgia gaudryi, and Allognathosuchus polyodon, all of them being sister groups to the Alligator clade.
New Lophiomerycid Ruminants from the Oligocene of the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan)
ABSTRACT A new assemblage of ruminants from Paali in the lower Chitarwata Formation, Bugti Hills, Balochistan, central Pakistan, includes two lophiomerycids, Lophiomeryx, and Nalameryx gen. nov.,
A new Late Eocene primate from the Krabi Basin (Thailand) and the diversity of Palaeogene anthropoids in southeast Asia
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A new small-sized fossil anthropoid primate from the Late Eocene Krabi locality in Thailand, Krabia minuta, is described, which shares several derived characters with the amphipithecids and displays several unique dental characters that have never been observed in other Eocene Asian anthropoids.
NEW BASAL SELENODONT ARTIODACTYLS FROM THE PONDAUNG FORMATION (LATE MIDDLE EOCENE, MYANMAR) AND THE PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF EARLY RUMINANTS
ABSTRACT A new genus and species of an assumed ruminant artiodactyl Thandaungia tinti and an enigmatic dichobunoid artiodactyl are reported from the late middle Eocene Pondaung Formation, central
A New Genus of Tragulid Ruminant from the Early Miocene of Kenya
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The type material of the tiny African tragulid “Dorcatherium” moruorotensis is re-describe and the new genus Afrotragulus is erected, the first African Miocene tragULid that does not belong to Dorcatherium, characterized by its elongated and stretched lower molars with a unique morphological dental pattern.
New Basal Ruminants from the Eocene of the Pondaung Formation, Myanmar
TLDR
The occurrence of both the oldest known Tragulidae and Stenomeryx bahinensis in the Paleogene of Myanmar supports the hypothesis that the initial radiation and diversification of basal ruminants probably occurred during the first part of the Eocene in southern Asia.
First African record of the Miocene Asian mouse-deer Siamotragulus (Mammalia, Ruminantia, Tragulidae): implications for the phylogeny and evolutionary history of the advanced selenodont tragulids
TLDR
It is shown that the genus Siamotragulus was not endemic to Asia as previously thought, and that a highly diverse guild of tragulids, including different members of the advanced selenodont clade, inhabited Africa as early as the Early Miocene (19–20 Ma).
New fossil remains from Bang Mark locality, Krabi Basin, southern Thailand
TLDR
Several mammal taxa from the poorly known late Eocene locality of Bang Mark, Krabi Basin in southern Thailand are described, providing information on the affinities of several genera that were uncertain so far.
A NEW BUNOSELENODONT ARTIODACTYL FROM THE MIDDLE EOCENE OF CHINA AND THE EARLY RECORD OF SELENODONT ARTIODACTYLS IN ASIA
The vast continent of Asia is thought to have played a major role in the origin and early differentiation of several extant groups of ungulate mammals, including artiodactyls (e.g. Beard, 1998).
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