New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology

@article{Corinaldesi2015NewPI,
  title={New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology},
  author={Cinzia Corinaldesi},
  journal={Frontiers in Marine Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={2}
}
  • C. Corinaldesi
  • Published 11 March 2015
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Frontiers in Marine Science
Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest and most remote biome of the biosphere. They play a fundamental role in global biogeochemical cycles and their functions allow existence of life on our planet. In the last 20 years enormous progress has been made in the investigation of deep-sea microbes, but the knowledge of the microbial ecology of the soft bottoms (representing >90% of the deep-sea floor surface) is still very limited. Deep-sea sediments host the largest fractions of Bacteria… 

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