New parenteral lipid emulsions for clinical use.

@article{Waitzberg2006NewPL,
  title={New parenteral lipid emulsions for clinical use.},
  author={Dan Linetzky Waitzberg and Raquel Susana Torrinhas and Thiago Manzoni Jacintho},
  journal={JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition},
  year={2006},
  volume={30 4},
  pages={
          351-67
        }
}
Routine use of parenteral lipid emulsions (LE) in clinical practice began in 1961, with the development of soybean oil (SO) - based LE. Although clinically safe, experimental reports indicated that SO-based LE could exert a negative influence on immunological functions. Those findings were related to its absolute and relative excess of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the low amount of omega-3 PUFA and also to its high PUFA content with an increased peroxidation risk. This… Expand
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Intravenous lipid emulsions
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  • 2018
TLDR
Omitting SO-based ILE in the critically ill patient for the first 7 days to observe if clinical outcomes are improved is investigated, and there is extremely limited research, and what is available is controversial. Expand
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  • 2009
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