New palaeozoogeographical evidence for the settlement of Madagascar

@article{Blench2007NewPE,
  title={New palaeozoogeographical evidence for the settlement of Madagascar},
  author={Roger Blench},
  journal={Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa},
  year={2007},
  volume={42},
  pages={69 - 82}
}
  • R. Blench
  • Published 1 January 2007
  • History
  • Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa
The island of Madagascar split from the African mainland some 50 million years ago, considerably prior to the evolution of humans and indeed primates. Its isolation permitted the evolution of a complex endemic flora and a fauna dominated by lemurs, whose nearest relatives are the lorises and galagos on the African and Asian mainland. Some 35% of the flora and 90% of the fauna are endemic, occurring nowhere else in the world. The absence of human populations for virtually all of this period… 

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