New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.

Abstract

Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy may reduce the risk of complications secondary to NOAF.

Cite this paper

@article{Jrgensen2015NewonsetAF, title={New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.}, author={Troels H\ojsgaard J\orgensen and Julie Bjerre Thygesen and Hans Gustav H\orsted Thyregod and Jesper Hastrup Svendsen and Lars S\ondergaard}, journal={The Journal of invasive cardiology}, year={2015}, volume={27 1}, pages={41-7} }