New material of the earliest hominid from the Upper Miocene of Chad

@article{Brunet2005NewMO,
  title={New material of the earliest hominid from the Upper Miocene of Chad},
  author={Michel Brunet and Franck Guy and David R. Pilbeam and Daniel E. Lieberman and Andossa Likius and Hassan Taisso Mackaye and Marcia Ponce de Le{\'o}n and Christoph P. E. Zollikofer and Patrick Vignaud},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={752-755}
}
Discoveries in Chad by the Mission Paléoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne have substantially changed our understanding of early human evolution in Africa. In particular, the TM 266 locality in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area yielded a nearly complete cranium (TM 266-01-60-1), a mandible, and several isolated teeth assigned to Sahelanthropus tchadensis and biochronologically dated to the late Miocene epoch (about 7 million years ago). Despite the relative completeness of the TM 266 cranium… 
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The results not only confirm that Sahelanthropus tchadensis cranium is a hominid but also reveal a unique mosaic of characters that is most similar to Australopithecus, particularly in the basicranium.
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