New insights on the history of canids in Oceania based on mitochondrial and nuclear data

@article{Cairns2016NewIO,
  title={New insights on the history of canids in Oceania based on mitochondrial and nuclear data},
  author={Kylie M. Cairns and Alan N. Wilton},
  journal={Genetica},
  year={2016},
  volume={144},
  pages={553-565}
}
How and when dingoes arrived in Oceania poses a fascinating question for scientists with interest in the historical movements of humans and dogs. The dingo holds a unique position as top terrestrial predator of Australia and exists in a wild state. In the first geographical survey of genetic diversity in the dingo using whole mitochondrial genomes, we analysed 16,428 bp in 25 individuals from five separate populations. We also investigated 13 nuclear loci to compare with the mitochondrial… 
Conservation implications for dingoes from the maternal and paternal genome: Multiple populations, dog introgression, and demography
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Findings from a broader survey of dingoes around Australia using both mitochondrial and Y chromosome markers confirm the presence of at least two geographically subdivided genetic populations, southeastern and northwestern, and investigate the timing of demographic expansions.
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Elevated inbreeding coefficients identified here suggest this population may be genetically compromised and in need of rescue; current lethal management strategies that do not consider genetic information should be suspended until further data can be gathered.
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An early introduction of dogs to Island Southeast Asia is seen, which does not appear to extend into the islands of Oceania, and a widespread dog clade found across the Pacific, including the Islands of Polynesia, is identified, which likely suggests a post-Lapita dog introduction from southern Island SoutheastAsia.
Genomic analysis of dingoes identifies genomic regions under reversible selection during domestication and feralization
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The results indicate that adaptation to domestication and feralization primarily affected different genomic regions, but that some genes, related to neurodevelopment, metabolism and reproduction, may have been reversibly affected in the two processes.
Genomic regions under selection in the feralization of the dingoes
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The results indicate that the feralization of the dingo induced positive selection on genomic regions correlated to neurodevelopment, metabolism and reproduction, in adaptation to a wild environment.
Geographic hot spots of dingo genetic ancestry in southeastern Australia despite hybridisation with domestic dogs
TLDR
A key finding of this study is the observation of several regions where dingoes were largely free of admixture from dogs, and several geographic hotspots of high dingo genetic ancestry within north-eastern New South Wales where there was a higher than expected prevalence of dingoes with no domestic dog ancestry.
Population genetics of wild Macaca fascicularis with low-coverage shotgun sequencing of museum specimens.
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It is demonstrated that low-coverage sequencing of nDNA from museum specimens provides enough data for examining broad phylogeographic patterns, although greater genome coverage and sequencing depth would be needed to distinguish between very closely related populations, such as those throughout the Philippines.
Genomic Characterization of External Morphology Traits in Kelpies Does Not Support Common Ancestry with the Australian Dingo
TLDR
None of the morphology variants analyzed offer support for co-ancestry of the Kelpie breed with the Australian Dingo, and a new variant site in the transcribed region of methionine sulfoxide reductase 3 that may relate to ear phenotype is described.
Taxonomic status of the Australian dingo: the case for Canis dingo Meyer, 1793.
TLDR
The sum of the evidence presented in this paper affirms the classification of the dingo as a distinct taxon, namely Canis dingo.
The myth of wild dogs in Australia: are there any out there?
TLDR
The results of microsatellite DNA testing from 5039 wild canids are collated to explore patterns of domestic dog ancestry in dingoes and observations of feral domestic dogs across the continent and challenge the perception that dingoes are virtually extinct in the wild and that feral dogs are common.
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