New insights into the epidemiology of childhood atopic dermatitis

@article{Flohr2014NewII,
  title={New insights into the epidemiology of childhood atopic dermatitis},
  author={Carsten Flohr and J Mann},
  journal={Allergy},
  year={2014},
  volume={69}
}
There is a growing desire to explain the worldwide rise in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD). Trend data on the burden of AD suggest that the picture in the developing world may soon resemble that of wealthier nations, where AD affects over 20% of children. This, combined with significant variations in prevalence within countries, emphasizes the importance of environmental factors. Many hypotheses have been explored, from the modulation of immune priming by hygiene, gut microbiota… Expand
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TLDR
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  • Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
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TLDR
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A wide range in AD prevalence and a rapid increase in prevalence strongly indicate that environmental factors play crucial roles in development of AD. Expand
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TLDR
The latest developments in the prevention of AD are reviewed, with a clear shift towards attempts to induce tolerance and enhancement of skin barrier function, as skin barrier breakdown plays an important role in AD development. Expand
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The Epidemiology and Global Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: A Narrative Review
TLDR
Assessment of epidemiological studies of the prevalence and incidence of atopic dermatitis in different age groups, focusing on data from studies published for 2009 to 2019 found that children would have a higher prevalence as compared to adolescents and adults. Expand
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