New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic

@article{Meng2017NewGM,
  title={New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic},
  author={Qingjin Meng and David M. Grossnickle and Di Liu and Yuguang Zhang and April I. Neander and Qiang Ji and Zhe‐Xi Luo},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={548},
  pages={291-296}
}
Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted for gliding. Characteristics of their digits provide evidence of roosting behaviour, as in dermopterans and bats, and their feet have a calcaneal calcar to support the uropagatium as in bats. The new… 
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